Courses


I sit daily at the anvil of my lectern and guide the heavy hammer of repetitious lectures, continuously beating out the same rhythm. Now and then I am stirred up somewhere by a nobler inclination, a desire to extend myself somewhat beyond this narrow sphere; but the blustering voice of Need immediately attacks me and, always truthful in its threats, drives me back to hard work without delay...

             ---Immanuel Kant, to Johann Gotthelf Linder, October 28, 1759



(Note that the courses listed here are not offered every academic year.)




 

Undergraduate Courses


[1A03] English and Cultural Studies: (Shorter Genres)
  1. Course Outline (Spring Term 2010)
  2. First-Year English and Cultural Studies Handbook (2009-2010)
  3. Tutorial times and locations:
    Tutorial 1 / 6:00-6:50 pm / CNH 332 (Karen Espiritu)
    Tutorial 2 / 6:00-6:50 pm / KTH B103 (Robin Chamberlain)
    Tutorial 3 / 9:00-10:00 pm / CNH 332 (Karen Espiritu)
    Tutorial 4 / 9:00-10:00 pm / KTH B103 (Robin Chamberlain)
  4. 1A03 Watchwords, Keywords, and Bywords
  5. Essay Assignment #1
  6. Essay Assignment #2
  7. Composition Marking Rubric for Essay # 2
  8. Correct diary entries for The Yellow Wallpaper
  9. Course evaluation information and link
  10. Tips and Suggestions: Preparing for and writing the final examination
  11. Revised final course grades for students in Robin Chamberlain's tutorials
[3AA3] English and Cultural Studies: (Gender and Sexuality: Queer Theory, Queer Lives)
  1. Revised Course Outline (with revised lecture schedule and assignments)
  2. To ensure that email from Avenue is forwarded to your McMaster email address, follow the directions here AND also select the box "Send a copy of each outgoing message to macid@mcmaster.ca
  3. Essay format and questions
  4. Midterm Examination Format and Tips
  5. Class cancelled 5 February. Midterm rescheduled to 26 February. Please see email sent through Avenue for details.
  6. Final Examination Format and Tips
[3M06] English and Cultural Studies: (Studies in 19th-Century British Literature and Culture: Romantic Literature and Culture)
  1. Course Outline (2012-2013)
  2. Archive of paintings and illustrations of William Blake
  3. Paintings and Engravings by William Blake shown in class
  4. Writing Tutors (Office Hours and Workshop Dates)
  5. Study Questions and Course Blog
  6. Study Tips and Format for Midterm Examination
  7. Essay Questions and Format
  8. Midterm Examination Remarks
  9. Sight analysis format and study tips
  10. Sight analysis (Term One) key and remarks
  11. Special office hours to return Term 1 essays: CNH 210, 4-5 pm, Wednesday 5 December.
  12. First Term Essays: Problems and Solutions
  13. Term 2 Sight Analysis Format and Study Tips
  14. Term 2 Sight Analysis Discussion and Answer Key
  15. Term 2 Essay Questions and Format
  16. Term 2 Midterm Study Tips and Format
  17. Term 2 Midterm Examination Remarks
  18. Course Evaluation:  https://evals.mcmaster.ca/login.php
  19. Final examination format and study tips
  20. Essay pickup:  Monday 15 April 5:00-6:00 pm, CNH 210.  If you are unable to pick up your essays at this time, please leave a stamped self-addressed envelope with the Department of English and Cultural Studies and I will be happy to return your essay by mail.
[3Q03] English and Cultural Studies / Cultural Studies and Critical Theory: (History of Critical Theory: Representation, Education, and the Question of the Just Community)

  1. Course Outline (Autumn Term 2013)
  2. Writing Tutor Office Hours
  3. Study Questions and Course Blog
  4. Midterm examination format and study tips
  5. Essay Format, Tips, and Questions
  6. Midterm Debrief
  7. Final examination format and study tips
  8. Final essays may be picked up Wednesday 18 December 5 pm-6 pm, CNH 210.  You may also email me on 18 December for your essay grade at dclark@mcmaster.ca.

[3QQ3] English and Cultural Studies / Cultural Studies and Critical Theory: ("Knowledge, Power, Precarity")

  1. Course Outline (Winter Term 2013)
  2. Study Questions and Course Blog (SQCB)
  3. Dr. Ailsa Kay's Office Hours and Contact Information
  4. Astra Taylor, Examined Life: Philosophy is in the Streets
  5. Midterm Examination Format & Study Tips
  6. Essay Questions and Format
  7. Midterm Examination Remarks
  8. Course Evaluation:  https://evals.mcmaster.ca/login.php
  9. Emmanuel Levinas, "The Name of a Dog, or Natural Rights."
  10. David L. Clark, "On Being 'the Last Kantian in Nazi Germany:' Dwelling with Animals after Levinas."
  11. Final examination format and study tips
  12. Essay pickup:  Monday 15 April 5:00-6:00 pm, CNH 210.  If you are unable to pick up your essays at this time, please leave a stamped self-addressed envelope with the Department of English and Cultural Studies and I will be happy to return your essay by mail.
[4AR3] English and Cultural Studies / Cultural Studies and Critical Theory: Rhetoric, Culture, Catastrophe: HIV/AIDS and its Representations
  1. Course Outline
  2. How can we not speak of HIV/AIDS?  Representing the Epidemic,” an audio interview by Wisconsin Public Radio with Dr. David L. Clark.
  3. Speaking of HIV/AIDS:  Some Reflections on the Local Faces of the Epidemic,” McMaster Medical School Journal 5.1(2008), by David L. Clark and Anna Joong. 
  4. To ensure that email from Avenue is forwarded to your McMaster email address, follow the directions here AND also select the box "Send a copy of each outgoing message to macid@mcmaster.ca
  5. Roger Hallas, “The View From Here”
  6. Synopsis of Silverlake Life (Center for Social Media, American University)
[3F03] Health Studies: Social and Cultural Aspects of HIV/AIDS
  1. Course Outline
[4J03] Health Studies: Narratives of Illness
  1. Course Outline (Autumn 2010)
  2. Narratives of Illness "Toolkit"
  3. Revised Seminar Schedule

 




Graduate Courses



[725] Romanticism, War and Peace


English 851 (Queen's University):
Romanticism, War and Peace

[774] English and Cultural Studies/Critical Theory: Derrida's Wake: On the Futures of Deconstruction

Final essays from 2005:

Final essays from 2009:

[767] English and Cultural Studies: Regarding Animals: Theories of Non-Human Life

  1. Course Outline (Winter Term 2012)
  2. The Half-Buried Dog Project (2009)
  3. The Half-Buried Dog Project (2011)
  4. Emmanuel Levinas, "The Name of a Dog" -This brief and rare autobiographical narrative by Levinas (published in the 1970's) begins with an ironic meditation on animals and food before turning towards memories of the philosopher's darkest days in a Nazi labour camp in which he falls under the gaze of the animal witness in the form of "a little dog" named "Bobby"--a dog he also calls "the last Kantian in Nazi Germany." Is that an appellation whose meanings could ever be exhausted? Calarco's remarks on Levinas (in Zoographies) should prove helpfulto orient yourself in Levinas.
  5. David L. Clark, "On Being 'the Last Kantian in Nazi Germany:' Dwelling with Animals after Levinas" - This essay, first published over a decade ago, reflects my initial attempt to unpack some of the problems and possibilities quickening Levinas's autobiographical narrative. Does Levinas's radical critique of philosophy remain oddly conserving when he is in the company of animals? Or are there openings towards animal others and otherness that the essay discloses, albeit in the form of a certain reticence?
  6. David L. Clark, "Who was 'the last Kantian in Nazi Germany'? Towards a Prehistory of the Postanimal: Kant, Levinas, and the Regard of Brutes" -This seminar paper, very much a work in progress, falls into two movements:
    i) After Derrida, I rapidly sketch out a project that explores the animal "gaze" in philosophical modernity, suggesting a series of test cases from Descartes to Kant to Cixous;
    ii) I return to Levinas's autobiographical account, this time to unpack more of the meanings of the phrase, "the last Kantian in Nazi Germany," and to revise my original position, suggesting ways in which Levinas's strange memorial, as a work of mourning, is in excess of itself in the neighbourhood of the animal. The seminar paper concludes with a series of questions about the "Liepaja film," rare archival footage that documents Nazi murders of Latvian Jews in the summer of 1941. An animal, a little dog, darts across the frame at the instant that the Latvian men are murdered. The local villagers and German soldiers observe as by turns mesmerized or bored spectators. But where are the witnesses to this atrocity? In that terrific void, the non-human animal takes on the burden of testifying to the lives and deaths of useless suffering.
  7. David L. Clark, "'Not ours, this death:' The Postanimal after the Posthuman."

Final essays from 2011:

  1. Tegan Herchenrader, "The Abattoir and Biopolitics: The Intersection of Structures of Oppression with the Species Divide"
  2. Allision Warwick, "Philosophical Phallogocentrism, Ecofeminism and the Question of the Animal"
  3. Natalie Childs, "Envisaging the Animal Other: The Ethics of Alterity in a Time of War"
  4. Andrew Reszitnyk, "From Photographic Representation of Animal Suffering to Posthumanist Politics"
  5. Tyler J. Pollard, "Stripping Bare the Logic of Exception: Visibilizing Sacrifice in Biopolitical Times"
  6. Oliver Jones, "'The Common Destiny of Creatures:' Animal Capital and Biopolitical Sovereignty in Cormac McCarthy's 'Blood Meridian'"
  7. Nandini Thiyagarajan, "Photographs of Atrocity and Responsibility: The Painful Labour of Recognizing the Absolute Other in Kevin Carter's 'Photo of a Sudanese Girl and Vulture'"

Final essays from 2009:


[795] English:
Living with HIV: On the Discourses of the Pandemic

[701] Cultural Studies/Critical Theory: Sites and Spaces of Critique: On the Remains of the University

Reading Notes for Jacques Derrida's "The Principle of Reason: The University in the Eyes of its Pupils and Mochlos."

Final essays from the graduate students in the 2010 seminar:

  1. Jill Bender, "Theorizing and Mobilizing Cultural Studies: A Cross-Comparision of Three Approaches"
  2. Valerie Savard, "Slow Thinking vs. Fast Production: Rethinking Time in the production of knowledge, The Problem of Progress, and the Complicated Argument in Public Intellectualism"
  3. Jaskiren Gill, "Asystasy: The Juridical University"
  4. Jane E. Turner-Cooke, "Women's Studies in Ruins: Women's Studies in the University Then, Now, and Yet to Come"
  5. Stephanie C. Leach, "Vampires Go to University: Academic Fads and the (Non)Future of the Humanities in the Neoliberal Academy"
  6. Nicole Redmond, "Emotions, Unlearning and Hope for Inclusion"
  7. Tyler Pollard and Noa Reich, "Timely Meditations: On the Uses and Abuses of Theory for Cultural Studies"
  8. Jessie Travis, "The 'dis'-orderly trinity: mind, body, and thinking in the neoliberal university."

Final essays from the graduate students in the 2007 seminar:

Final essays from the graduate students in the 2006 seminar: