The Bertrand Russell Research Centre

McMaster University

Mills Memorial Library, Room L108
1280 Main Street West
Hamilton, ON L8S 4L6, Canada
Telephone: (905) 525–9140 x24896
Fax: (905) 522–1277

(For general enquiries contact Arlene Duncan)

Press Releases

83RD ANGLO-AMERICAN CONFERENCE OF HISTORIANS July 3–4, 2014
The War Work of an Anti-War Activist: Catherine Marshall, 1914–1918
Dr. Jo Vellacott

SPOKESMAN BOOKS ADVANCE INFORMATION
A Pacifist at War: Letters and Writings 1914–1918. By Bertrand Russell
Edited by Nicholas Griffin

"WHILE ENGLAND (AND RUSSELL) SLEPT: THE START OF WORLD WAR I"
by Kenneth Blackwell
Delivered at the annual meeting of the Bertrand Russell Society, University of Windsor, June 2014

Correspondence just prior to August 4, 1914 shows that Russell, in company with almost everyone else outside the Foreign Office, was unaware of the serious state of international relations. I read extracts from letters, both newly acquired and ones long familiar to researchers, and relate his experience to his later political watchfulness—even to his possible exculpation of Sir Edward Grey's secret diplomacy.

What’s New: Updated November 2013.

 + The Collected Papers of Bertrand Russell

+ The Collected Letters of Bertrand Russell

+ Russell: the Journal of Bertrand Russell Studies (now digitized)

+ What’s New

+ Donations


+ Principia Mathematica at 100 monograph

+ After “On Denoting” monograph

+ Exhibition Handlist

+ Intellect and Social Conscience monograph

+ Old Newsletters


Bertrand Russell:
The Man

+ Chronology of Russell

+ Last Essay: “1967”

+ The Bertrand Russell Gallery


* Faculty of Humanities

* Russell Archives

* McMaster University


+ Society for the Study of the History of Analytic Philosophy

+ Bertrand Russell Society

The reputation of Bertrand Russell (1872–1970), the third Earl Russell, as one of the greatest thinkers of the twentieth century has only increased with time. In a massive and seminal series of publications in the early years of the last century Russell transformed logic and placed it at the centre of philosophic inquiry. The impact of these, and later works in which he confronted other fundamental problems of philosophy, has been profound, even on scholars who have disputed his conclusions. In a parallel intellectual life as social critic, political thinker and humanist, meanwhile, Russell addressed many issues of vital import to the history of the twentieth century: nationalism and imperialism, modern industrialism, Soviet Communism, and the nuclear peril, to name but a few.

When Russell’s papers came to McMaster in the late 1960s, it was inevitable that the university would become the main centre for research on Russell’s life and work. The collection was not only the largest available on Russell anywhere, it dwarfed all the other collections put together. Its contribution to international scholarship started immediately and has continued ever since. Scores of books and hundreds of articles have been published using material from the Russell Archives.

In addition to all this independent scholarly activity, many things have been done at McMaster to enhance and enlarge the collection, to make it more accessible, to publish material from it, and to foster Russell studies around the world. Russell: the Journal of Bertrand Russell Studies (now in its 42nd year of publication) and the McMaster Edition of The Collected Papers of Bertrand Russell will be the best known to people who do not use the Archives on a regular basis. The Centre has also launched another major scholarly enterprise, an electronic edition of all Russell's correspondence.

The creation of the Bertrand Russell Research Centre in 2000 has given all three a permanent home within McMaster’s Faculty of Humanities. The McMaster University Library remains responsible for the running of the Archives and for the care and preservation of the papers, while the Centre takes responsibility for the publication of Russell material and for fostering Russell research. Russell is now published by the Centre, which has also taken over the work of the former Bertrand Russell Editorial Project. And the Centre has become the official home of the Collected Letters project.

The official opening of the Centre took place on 16 November 2000 with Ray Monk giving a public lecture, “The Continuing Importance of Bertrand Russell”, in McMaster University’s Convocation Hall. The opening coincided with a major exhibition of Russell material at the McMaster Museum of Art. Among other art works, the exhibition included the Epstein bust and the Augustus John drawing of Russell, as well as photographs, political cartoons, and many other Russell memorabilia. The Exhibition Handlist is available for purchase.


The text for this page was prepared at McMaster University.
Page maintained by Arlene Duncan. Last modified 9 September 2014.