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**CANCELLED**

Unfortunately this event has been cancelled due to the inclement weather in the United States disrupting Dr. Eubanks’ travel plans. We apologize for any inconvenience, and we hope to be able to re-schedule Dr. Eubanks’ visit for the fall. Any re-scheduled events will be posted on our website.

The Graduate Program in Gender Studies and Feminist Research, The Department of Communication Studies and Multimedia, The Department of Anthropology and the YWCA Hamilton are pleased to present:

Virginia Eubanks, Associate Professor of Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies, SUNY, Albany

Virginia Eubanks is the author of Digital Dead End: Fighting for Social Justice in the Information Age (MIT Press, 2011) and co-editor, with Alethia Jones, of Ain’t Gonna Let Nobody Turn Me Around: Forty Years of Movement Building with Barbara Smith (SUNY Press, 2014). She is also the cofounder of Our Knowledge, Our Power (OKOP), a grassroots economic justice and welfare rights organization.

Professor Eubanks is currently working on her third book, Digital Poorhouse, for St. Martin’s Press. In it, she examines how new data-driven systems regulate and discipline the poor in the United States. The book focuses on the use
 of predictive analytics in Child Protective Services in Pennsylvania; the automation and privatization of welfare eligibility processes in Indiana; and a digital registry that tracks homeless communities in California.

She is a Fellow at New America, a Washington, D.C. think tank dedicated to renewing American politics, prosperity, and purpose in the Digital Age and the recipient of a three-year research grant from the Digital Trust Foundation (with Seeta Peña Gangadharan and Joseph Turow) to explore the meaning of digital privacy and data justice in poor and working-class communities.

Free Public Lecture

“The Digital Poorhouse: Regulating the Poor in the 21st Century

Tuesday, January 26, 3:30 pm, KTH B124

 

New data-driven technologies in public services such as child protection, law enforcement and welfare offer opportunities to integrate programs, lower barriers to participation, and promote administrative efficiencies. But they are also part of a long and often-shameful history of invasive, unaccountable, and targeted information collection in poor and working-class neighborhoods.

In this talk, critical media scholar and data justice activist Virginia Eubanks will consider: Can predictive algorithms, big data sets and automated decision-making contribute to economic equity, racial justice, and the health of democracy in the United States? Or are they simply part of an architecture of surveillance that regulates, disciplines, and punishes the poor?

All welcome. Poster attached.

 

Eubanks poster

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Date/Time
Date(s) - January 26, 2016
3:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Location
KTH B124

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